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All My Friends Are Doing It: Life After Life-Porn

BY LAUREN COFFEY

Studies show that use of social media such as Facebook and Instagram for more than two hours a day directly and negatively impacts general happiness and well-being in young adults. This is due in part to the pressure, among millennial women in particular, to post about their lives in relation to other users. For this reason, it is clear that social media has become a source of near-constant fatigue through self-inflicted social angst. Ultimately, if millennial women aren’t using and viewing social media in a way that makes them feel good, how do we expect them to feel about the brands that advertise on those platforms? Ad serve becomes annoying, at best, and overwhelming chatter leading to shutdown, at worst. Herein lies an opportunity for brands to set a standard for the average female user on social media by moving from alignment with aspirational life-porn to inspirational interconnectivity, thereby shifting the focus to something people want to be a part of.

 

The truth is that no one is living on anyone else’s sidelines. We’re all living our own worthy, beautiful, crazy interconnected lives. Brands can lead the charge to remind us of the reason social media exists, which is to foster and grow interpersonal connections that transcend time and distance. If they can successfully shift and reframe, brands can be among the forerunners to focus on outward interconnectivity, using social media as a window to the world as opposed to a mirror to boost their own visibility. When a brand inspires positivity and relationship by reaching out and addressing a need, it has the power to unite people through a common cause, rather than being merely aspirational because of the baseline of what the brand offers in terms of goods or services.

 

One brand that is doing this well (and also happens to be a client of MullenLowe U.S.) is Playtex by Hanes, with its #PlaytexPositivity campaign. It highlights the conversation around how women complimenting one another can be incredibly empowering and how body image can be impacted for the better by simply telling someone that she looks nice. In fact, a whopping 80% of women say that positive feedback has had a major influence on their lives, while 91% of women say that positive feedback can transform their day. Because of this message of affirmation, the campaign generated organic brand goodwill through users sharing and keeping the conversation about the campaign, and therefore the brand, moving forward.

 

It is important for brands to consider reframing how to speak to female consumers on social channels, and it should be done with the emotional well-being of the consumer at the forefront. If this is done well, the brand stands to build a firmer rapport with its target market, thus gaining a soft return-on-investment in terms of brand affinity and trust generation among female users. This bond of loyalty between brand and consumer creates a kinship that is arguably one of the most essential precursors to sales conversion in a competitive market.

 

 

Sources:

  1. Abad-Mancheño, Cindy, and Hayward, Caroline. “Female Positivity.” Frank About Women. 2017.
  2. Facebook Use Predicts Declines in Subjective Well-Being in Young Adults Kross E, Verduyn P, Demiralp E, Park J, Lee DS, et al. (2013) Facebook Use Predicts Declines in Subjective Well-Being in Young Adults. PLOS ONE 8(8): e69841.
  3. Social Media and Young People’s Mental Health and Well-Being. Royal Society of Public Health
Lauren Coffey About the Author
Lauren Coffey Front Desk Coordinator

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